“People think of depression as being just sadness. 
It’s much, much too much sadness, much too much grief at far too slight a cause.

(…) what it is that causes some people to be more resilient than other people. What are the mechanisms that allow people to survive?

Depression is so exhausting.
 It takes up so much of your time and energy, and silence about it, it really does make the depression worse.

Shutting out the depression strengthens it. While you hide from it, it grows. And the people who do better are the ones who are able to tolerate the fact that they have this condition. Those who can tolerate their depression are the ones who achieve resilience.

Valuing one’s depression does not prevent a relapse, but it may make the prospect of relapse and even relapse itself easier to tolerate. The question is not so much of finding great meaning and deciding your depression has been very meaningful. It’s of seeking that meaning and thinking, when it comes again,“This will be hellish, but I will learn something from it.”

The opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality, and these days, my life is vital, even on the days when I’m sad. I felt that funeral in my brain, and I sat next to the colossus at the edge of the world, and I have discovered something inside of myself that I would have to call a soul that I had never formulated until that day 20 years ago when hell came to pay me a surprise visit. I think that while I hated being depressed and would hate to be depressed again, I’ve found a way to love my depression. I love it because it has forced me to find and cling to joy. I love it because each day I decide, sometimes gamely, and sometimes against the moment’s reason, to cleave to the reasons for living. And that, I think, is a highly privileged rapture.”

Books, Links

The Science of Sleep: Dreaming, Depression, and How REM Sleep Regulates Negative Emotion by Maria Popova via Brainpickings

Book:  The Twenty-four Hour Mind: The Role of Sleep and Dreaming in Our Emotional Lives by Rosalind D. Cartwright.

Link
Links, Psychology

Cynthia W. Lubow: What It’s Like Inside a Depressed Person’s Head

“A major depressive episode can alter not only a person’s mood and sense of belonging but also his or her reality.”

“Major depression feels like intense pain that can’t be identified in any particular part of the body. The most (normally) pleasant and comforting touch can feel painful to the point of tears. People seem far away—on the other side of a glass bubble. No one seems to understand or care, and people seem insincere. Depression is utterly isolating.”

Link

“I might look successful and happy being in front of you today, but I once suffered from severe depression and was in total despair. The violin, which meant everything to me, became a grave burden on me. [...]
In the midst of hardship, it was the music that gave me, and it restored my soul. [...]
Now, I use my music to reach people’s hearts and have found there are no boundaries. My audience is anyone who is here to listen, even those who are not familiar with classical music.”

- Ji-Hae Park

“We were never designed for the sedentary, indoor, sleep-deprived, socially-isolated, fast-food-laden, frenetic pace of modern life.”
– Stephen Ilardi.

More details about the Therapeutic Lifestyle Change here: http://psych.ku.edu/tlc/

“Depression is okay. We’re people. We’re people and we struggle, and we suffer and we bleed and we cry. And if you think that true strength means never showing any weakness, then I am here to tell you ‘you’re wrong’. You’re wrong, because it’s the opposite. We’re people and we have problems. We’re not perfect and that’s okay. So, we need to stop the ignorance , stop the intolerance, stop the stigma, and stop the silence. We need to take away the taboos, take a look at the truth and start talking. Because the only way, we’re gonna beat the problem that people are battling alone, is by standing strong together. By standing strong together. And I believe that we can.”

- Kevin Breel

Books

The Science of Sleep: Dreaming, Depression, and How REM Sleep Regulates Negative Emotions

“Memory is never a precise duplicate of the original… it is a continuing act of creation. Dream images are the product of that creation.”
– Rosalind D. Cartwright, The Twenty-four Hour Mind: The Role of Sleep and Dreaming in Our Emotional Lives

Source: Brain Pickings.

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