Arts, Audios, Cultural & Ethnical, Films, music, Videos

大鱼海棠: Big Fish & Begonia


I have just watched one of the most beautiful animations. If you already like Studio Ghibli’s works, old myths and legends, crafted soundtrack and young love stories, you’re going to love this one. This made me wonder why Chinese animations are not even more popular and broadcast abroad. And you might ask for more after watching it.

I have selected some of the songs that feature in the film. Hope you’ll enjoy them.

周深 Zhou Shen: 大鱼 Big Fish, theme song of 大鱼海棠

陈奕迅 Eason Chan: 在这个世界相遇 In this world meet

For those of you who are in Mainland China and have a VIP pass, the film is available to watch on iQiyi platform:
http://www.iqiyi.com/v_19rrm3u1io.html

Keep watching till the very end… Not only the ending song is beautiful, but there are precious few seconds that you don’t want to miss, in order to grasp the whole story.

BONUS: For the music aficionados, there’s a dizi cover (Chinese flute) of the theme song by Dong Min 彼岸天的海与梦|董敏笛子演绎大鱼海棠印象曲《大鱼》.

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Cultural & Ethnical, Photography, Projects, Stories

生き甲斐 : Ikigai

Ikigai is a Japanese concept that means “a reason for being”, “the reason to live”, your raison d’être.

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Morning mist. Mountains of Anhui, China.

In the culture of Okinawa, Ikigai is thought of as “your reason to wake up in the morning”, your reason to enjoy life.

So, have you found your Ikigai? What makes you get up in the morning?

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Icheon has a 1,000-year history of producing celadon porcelain. The city, which was named South Korea’s first Special Ceramics Industry Zone in 2005 and a UNESCO City of Crafts and Folk Arts in 2010, boasts a large number of industrial-academic-research infrastructures, including the Korea Ceramics Art High School, the Korea Ceramics Foundation, the Korea Institute of Ceramics Engineering and Technology, and SK hynix.

The exhibit “Icheon: Reviving the Korean Ceramic Tradition” was on display at the American Museum of Ceramic Art, AMOCA from October 12th- December 29th, 2013.
More info:
http://www.amoca.org

Icheon: Reviving the Korean Cermics Tradition

Audiotrack:
https://audiojungle.net/item/piano-/3415703

And yet we still insist, by and large, in thinking that we can understand China by simply drawing on Western experience, looking at it through Western eyes, using Western concepts. If you want to know why we unerringly seem to get China wrong — our predictions about what’s going to happen to China are incorrect — this is the reason.”

“Unfortunately, I think, I have to say that I think attitude towards China is that of a kind of little Westerner mentality. It’s kind of arrogant. It’s arrogant in the sense that we think that we are best, and therefore we have the universal measure. And secondly, it’s ignorant. We refuse to really address the issue of difference.

You know, there’s a very interesting passage in a book by Paul Cohen, the American historian. And Paul Cohen argues that the West thinks of itself as probably the most cosmopolitan of all cultures. But it’s not. In many ways, it’s the most parochial, because for 200 years, the West has been so dominant in the world that it’s not really needed to understand other cultures, other civilisations. Because, at the end of the day, it could, if necessary by force, get its own way. Whereas those cultures — virtually the rest of the world, in fact, which have been in a far weaker position, vis-a-vis the West — have been thereby forced to understand the West, because of the West’s presence in those societies. And therefore, they are, as a result, more cosmopolitan in many ways than the West.

For 200 years, the world was essentially governed by a fragment of the human population. That’s what Europe and North America represented. The arrival of countries like China and India — between them 38 percent of the world’s population — and others like Indonesia and Brazil and so on, represent the most important single act of democratisation in the last 200 years. Civilisations and cultures, which had been ignored, which had no voice, which were not listened to, which were not known about, will have a different sort of representation in this world. As humanists, we must welcome, surely, this transformation, and we will have to learn about these civilisations.

Depending on the context, depending on the outcome, choose your paradigm. You see, because both the paradigms are human constructions. They are cultural creations, not natural phenomena. And so the next time you meet someone, a stranger, one request: Understand that you live in the subjective truth, and so does he. Understand it. And when you understand it you will discover something spectacular. You will discover that within infinite myths lies the eternal truth. Who sees it all? Varuna has but a thousand eyes. Indra, a hundred. You and I, only two.”

– Devdutt Pattanaik