“What I learned was that it’s the environment, and if you get the environment right, every single one of us has the capacity to do these remarkable things, and more importantly, others have that capacity too.”
“And when we felt safe amongst our own, the natural reaction was trust and cooperation.”
“You see, if the conditions are wrong, we are forced to expend our own time and energy to protect ourselves from each other, and that inherently weakens the organization. When we feel safe inside the organization, we will naturally combine our talents and our strengths and work tirelessly to face the dangers outside and seize the opportunities.”
“Great leaders would never sacrifice the people to save the numbers. They would sooner sacrifice the numbers to save the people.”
Leadership is a choice. It is not a rank.”
“We call them leaders because they go first. We call them leaders because they take the risk before anybody else does. We call them leaders because they will choose to sacrifice so that their people may be safe and protected and so their people may gain, and when we do, the natural response is that our people will sacrifice for us. They will give us their blood and sweat and tears to see that their leader’s vision comes to life, and when we ask them, “Why would you do that? Why would you give your blood and sweat and tears for that person?” they all say the same thing: “Because they would have done it for me.” And isn’t that the organization we would all like to work in?
– Simon Sinek
Source: TED

52 min Documentary (long version).
Covering an area that is the size of France, the Loess Plateau is home to more than 50 million very poor farmers who have suffered centuries of severe soil erosion, leading to massive environmental degradation and poverty. The film documents a remarkable paradigm shift: the rebirth of a self-sustaining ecosystem in the dry and remote Loess Plateau region of China, and identifies why and how a World Bank/government joint project has completely changed the landscape of the region.

In California’s drought-stricken community of Lompico, a water shortage forces locals to rethink how they use water. From recycling shower water to piping water in from a neighbouring district, residents take urgent action to keep the town from drying up.

Read about five dramatic ways California is tackling drought:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/05/140508-drought-california-water-shortage-conservation/

Producer & Editor: Kelly Loudenberg
Videographer: Arianna Lapenne