In Will Africa Feed China? Deborah Bräutigam, one of the world’s leading experts on China and Africa, probes the myths and realities behind the media headlines.

I have already watched a few talks by Deborah Bräutigam and I like to hear what she has to stay not only because her work is very well documented and articulated, but also because she has a very global approach and a very nuanced speech while presenting her cases.



“People think of depression as being just sadness. 
It’s much, much too much sadness, much too much grief at far too slight a cause.

(…) what it is that causes some people to be more resilient than other people. What are the mechanisms that allow people to survive?

Depression is so exhausting.
 It takes up so much of your time and energy, and silence about it, it really does make the depression worse.

Shutting out the depression strengthens it. While you hide from it, it grows. And the people who do better are the ones who are able to tolerate the fact that they have this condition. Those who can tolerate their depression are the ones who achieve resilience.

Valuing one’s depression does not prevent a relapse, but it may make the prospect of relapse and even relapse itself easier to tolerate. The question is not so much of finding great meaning and deciding your depression has been very meaningful. It’s of seeking that meaning and thinking, when it comes again,“This will be hellish, but I will learn something from it.”

The opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality, and these days, my life is vital, even on the days when I’m sad. I felt that funeral in my brain, and I sat next to the colossus at the edge of the world, and I have discovered something inside of myself that I would have to call a soul that I had never formulated until that day 20 years ago when hell came to pay me a surprise visit. I think that while I hated being depressed and would hate to be depressed again, I’ve found a way to love my depression. I love it because it has forced me to find and cling to joy. I love it because each day I decide, sometimes gamely, and sometimes against the moment’s reason, to cleave to the reasons for living. And that, I think, is a highly privileged rapture.”

https://ted.com/talks/view/id/1722

“Although we’re not the first ones to find bacteria that can break down phthalates, we were the first ones to look into our local river and find a possible solution to a local problem. We have not only shown that bacteria can be the solution to plastic pollution, but also that being open to uncertain outcomes and taking risks create opportunities for unexpected discoveries.”
– Jeanny Yao

“Einstein once said, ‘You can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking you used when you created them.’ If we’re making plastic synthetically, then we think the solution would be to break them down biochemically.”
– Miranda Wang

Brené Brown, Ph.D., LMSW is a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. She has spent the past decade studying vulnerability, courage, worthiness, and shame.

“Vulnerability is our most accurate measurement of courage.”

– Brené Brown

Source: TED.com
More here: brenebrown.com