Arts, Literature, Love, Photography, Quotes

“Deep in the meadow…

“Deep in the meadow, hidden far away
A cloak of leaves, a moonbeam ray
Forget your woes and let your troubles lay
And when it’s morning again, they’ll wash away
Here it’s safe, here it’s warm
Here the daisies guard you from every harm
Here your dreams are sweet and tomorrow brings them true
Here is the place where I love you.”

― Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games

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“What I learned was that it’s the environment, and if you get the environment right, every single one of us has the capacity to do these remarkable things, and more importantly, others have that capacity too.”
“And when we felt safe amongst our own, the natural reaction was trust and cooperation.”
“You see, if the conditions are wrong, we are forced to expend our own time and energy to protect ourselves from each other, and that inherently weakens the organization. When we feel safe inside the organization, we will naturally combine our talents and our strengths and work tirelessly to face the dangers outside and seize the opportunities.”
“Great leaders would never sacrifice the people to save the numbers. They would sooner sacrifice the numbers to save the people.”
Leadership is a choice. It is not a rank.”
“We call them leaders because they go first. We call them leaders because they take the risk before anybody else does. We call them leaders because they will choose to sacrifice so that their people may be safe and protected and so their people may gain, and when we do, the natural response is that our people will sacrifice for us. They will give us their blood and sweat and tears to see that their leader’s vision comes to life, and when we ask them, “Why would you do that? Why would you give your blood and sweat and tears for that person?” they all say the same thing: “Because they would have done it for me.” And isn’t that the organization we would all like to work in?
– Simon Sinek
Source: TED

“If I start by assuming the worst and work backwards, I can make sure that the protections we build work for both expected and unexpected use cases.”

“Given that I spend my days and nights imagining the worst that could happen, it wouldn’t be surprising if my worldview was gloomy. It’s not. The vast majority of interactions I see — and I see a lot, believe me — are positive, people reaching out to help or to connect or share information with each other. It’s just that for those of us dealing with scale, for those of us tasked with keeping people safe, we have to assume the worst will happen, because for us, a one-in-a-million chance is pretty good odds.”

“I was sitting in a slum outside Gurgaon just next to Delhi, one of the flashiest, brightest new cities popping up in India right now, and I was talking to workers who worked in garment sweatshops down the road, and I asked them what message they would like me to take to the brands. They didn’t say money. They said, “The people who employ us treat us like we are less than human, like we don’t exist. Please ask them to treat us like human beings.” That’s my simple understanding of human rights. That’s my simple proposition to you, my simple plea to every decision-maker in this room, everybody out there. We can all make a decision to come together and pick up the balls and run with the balls that governments have dropped. If we don’t do it, we’re abandoning hope, we’re abandoning our essential humanity, and I know that’s not a place we want to be, and we don’t have to be there. So I appeal to you. Join us, come into that safe space, and let’s start to make this happen.”

– Auret van Heerden